Introduction to Graphene

…my consuming interest

Why be interested in graphene?

Who wouldn’t want to be interested in this, it is going to be revolutionary.

A new material, isolated in 2004, it is the strongest material ever measured, transparent, flexible, conducts electricity and heat better than copper and has the highest melting point. The uses for this stuff will be endless.

Now is a good time to be interested too. Graphene is starting to come out of the laboratory and find practical real-world applications.

It is already being used to give elite sports competitors and edge with graphene enhanced running shoes, rubber tyres for bikes that grip better and give faster lap times. Graphene is even making a discreet involvement in racing cars where it can make carbon fibre components stronger and lighter.

Graphene inks are being used to create electrically conductive patterns on textiles and other flexible materials; the smart clothing of the future will contain graphene.

Expect to hear of graphene in construction. It makes concrete stronger, It can even make concrete electrically conductive giving us roads and floors with built in heating and no wiring that can fail.

Graphene has a sister material, graphene oxide. The latest research shows that human cells can grow over graphene oxide scaffolds. This opens up the possibility to make new parts for our bodies. Even more exciting is the discovery that human nerve cells will regrow along guides made from graphene oxide.

And that is just the tip of the iceberg, see what I mean? Who wouldn’t want to be interested in graphene?

Latest Blog Posts

Click here to view the full blog

Electric current controls water flow through graphene oxide membranes

An international team led by Manchester University, UK has discovered a fascinating property of graphene oxide membranes. (one micron thick membrane made from graphene oxide (GO) with a flake size of approximately 10 μm).  They found that water would pass through the membrane.  However when they applied an electric current across the membrane the water flow

Read More »

Supercapacitor made from reduced graphene oxide

This is work done by a team at Louisiana State University in the USA. They found that laying graphene oxide on a patterned surface then exposing the material to bright flashes of light did two things. Firstly it reduced the graphene oxide back to graphene and this makes it electrically conductive. Secondly it exfoliated the

Read More »

Graphene nano-bridge made to emit light

This is work done by a team at the Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST). Graphene is not a perfect conductor of electricity. So when you put an electric current through graphene it heats up a little. Put a lot of current though and it gets very hot and

Read More »

New graphene / polymer composite made by bonding nanoplates

This is work done by a joint Chinese and American team. They have glued together graphene nanoplates to make a composite that does not need carbon fibre. The graphic shows the steps they had to go through to make this work. The resulting composite conducted electricity and was fairly strong with a tensile strength of

Read More »

Vertical graphite spikes are antibacterial

This is research done by a team at Chalmers University in Sweden.They made graphene spikes that were 60 to 100nm high form vertically from a surface by plasma deposition. They found these spikes stopped bacterial biofilms forming by puncturing thecell walls. Human cells were much larger and so not affected by the spikes. At one

Read More »